Security Challenges Faced by Cloud Hosting – Handling Data

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Apr 152013
 

Security Challenges Faced by Cloud Hosting – Handling Data

By Stuart P Mitchell

The final part of this article looks at how and where data is stored or handled and the issues that arise in cloud computing through the process of creating multiple instances of data across multiple server platforms. Cloud computing relies on this mechanism for many of its key benefits but, by doing so, invites further challenges for data security.

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Security Challenges Faced by Cloud Hosting – Handling Data

Data Protection

Data collection and storage is usually bound by legislation or regulation which varies depending on the jurisdiction under which a service falls. Most prominent regulations, however (e.g., those in the US and Europe) share certain principles in common that demand, for example, that data is collected with the subject’s permission, with their full understanding of what the data will be used for, only if the data is relevant to the stated purpose, only for that stated purpose, with transparency and with accountability. For the subject of the data this should mean that they consent to the service provider collecting data relating to them, they know what data that is, who has access to it and why, as well as how to access it themselves if they want to.

It is therefore paramount for IT service providers, who have stewardship of any data, that they are able to identify where data is stored within those services that they provide, how to access it and whether it is secure. However, the abstraction of cloud services in particular can cause challenges for those who utilise them to store or process data because they cannot necessarily guarantee where this data is at any given time. The physical location and guardianship can be obscured, with data hosting sometimes crossing different sites, geographical boundaries and even jurisdictions.

In such cases where private information is involved, the answer often lies with private clouds employing on-site hosting as mentioned in earlier parts of this article, but there is often a trade off with some of the other benefits of cloud which are discussed below.

Multiple Data Instances

Two of cloud computing’s biggest selling points are that of redundancy and scalability. These are often achieved by utilising multiple servers to provide the underlying computing resource, with, therefore, the data within a cloud service being ultimately stored across these numerous servers. Moreover, cloud structures will also create multiple instances of data across these servers to provide a further layer of redundancy protection. However, the more servers that data is shared across, the greater the risk that this data may be susceptible to security vulnerabilities on one of those servers (e.g., malware, hacks); whilst the more instances there are of a piece of data, the greater the risk (by definition) that that data may be accessed and used by unauthorised users. Essentially, data in one place needs to be protected once, data stored in a 100 places, will need to be protected 100 times.

What’s more, as each server and platform is likely to be shared, particularly in the public cloud model, each data instance may be subject to another security threat introduced, inadvertently or otherwise by the 3rd party users who share the resources. In a private cloud, however, this threat is reduced as the cloud resource exists behind the one organisation’s firewall and fewer instances of the data are created in the first place (fewer servers to pool). Consequently there is always a degree of trade off between introducing security risk and the level of redundancy and scalability built into a system (although of course redundancy can prevent data loss in itself). Private clouds may be more secure but with smaller pool of resource they cannot match the levels of redundancy and scalability offered by the vast capacities of public clouds.

© Stuart Mitchell 2013

To find out more about overcoming the security challenges faced by cloud hosting you can visit this blog on cloud hosting and IaaS.

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Security Challenges Faced by Cloud Hosting – Building in Security

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Apr 152013
 

Security Challenges Faced by Cloud Hosting – Building in Security

By Stuart P Mitchell

As mentioned in part one of this article there are multiple stages at which information stored through cloud hosting platforms must be protected against data loss and unauthorised access. The first step is to secure the physical elements of a cloud hosting platform as described, however, the additional steps involve architectural and software based security measures to protect not only the platforms on which the data is stored, but also the data in transit and the subsequent points of access that allow valid users to interact with the data.

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Security Challenges Faced by Cloud Hosting – Building in Security

Public Cloud Models

Cloud offerings, including cloud hosting, can be broadly categorised, in terms of the way they are deployed (regardless of whether they are Infrastructure, Platform or Software as a Service), as either being Public Cloud, Private Cloud or Hybrid Cloud (a combination of the two). Much of the distinction between public and private clouds revolves around levels of security and privacy rather than technical specifications. As the name suggests, public clouds use points of access which are accessible on public networks (e.g., the internet), public networks to transfer information and shared clustered cloud servers to store information. Essentially anyone can ‘knock on the door’ of the cloud service, attempt to intercept its information in transit and potentially share its server resources. The services, should of course be protected by end point authentication, data encryption and anti-virus/firewall measures on the server platform to keep data secure but they are exposed to ‘attack’ at almost every point in their architecture. It is therefore important that consumers of such services are aware of what risks each service carries and what the provider puts in place to safeguard their customers’ data.

Private Cloud

For organisations dealing with highly sensitive data, however, they may demand more restrictions on who can attempt to access the cloud service, the networks it utilises and the sharing of cloud servers. In particular, some organisations will be governed by regulation which demands that they retain control of data for which they are ultimately responsible.

Private clouds may employ differing architectures, but they are defined by providing the aforementioned security measures. Servers can be located on an organisation’s own premises or within a data centre facility but they will be ringfenced for the use of that sole client; whether it be with physical hardware separation or virtualised separation between server clusters, an organisation’s cloud platform will be behind their own firewall. What’s more, to protect data in transit, and to prevent untrusted users from accessing the cloud, private clouds can again use either physical or virtualised separation from public shared networks. For example, an organisation can utilise local area network (LAN) connections to access a cloud which hosted on internal on-site servers or a physically distinct leased line when connecting to servers in a remote location. Alternatively, technologies such as MPLS (Multi-Label Switching Protocol) can be used to provide organisations with trusted network connections, controlled by individual providers, across public network infrastructure. The latter can provide more flexibility and allow the organisation to benefit to a greater extent from the scalability that cloud hosting providers can provide.

Hybrid Cloud

A hybrid cloud combines elements of public and private clouds and so can provide the security that organizations require for their sensitive and private data whilst allowing them to access cost efficient scalability in the public cloud for their non-sensitive operations. For example, an organization may store all of their protected client data in systems and databases hosted on site in a private cloud as required by regulation but pull computing resource from a public cloud for their brochureware website’s hosting platform.

Data Centre Expertise

The previous part of this article mentioned the benefits of a data center location in terms of the physical maintenance of servers preventing data loss. Similarly it is worth noting that both public clouds and private clouds which utilise a third party data center location for their server hosting (whilst introducing vulnerabilities in data transfer) can benefit from on-site expertise in the maintenance of software and anti-virus measures, including for example patching, to optimise both the preservation and security of data.

© Stuart Mitchell 2013

To find out more about overcoming the security challenges faced by cloud hosting you can visit this cloud hosting blog.

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Security Challenges Faced by Cloud Hosting – Physical Security

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Apr 152013
 

Security Challenges Faced by Cloud Hosting – Physical Security

By Stuart P Mitchell

The following three posts explore the topic of cloud hosting and the challenges it faces in providing secure data environments for enterprise consumers. In addition, it discusses the measures taken to combat these challenges, whether they be physical risks to hosting platforms or cybercrime.

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Security Challenges Faced by Cloud Hosting – Physical Security

The Need for Secure Data

The concept of security in all aspects of computing can be said to fall into two areas, the preservation of data and the control of data. The first of these concerns is the ability to ensure that data is not lost or corrupted, whether it be sensitive (i.e., private) or not. Data preservation may be essential for the effective operations of a business, for example, to be able to contact suppliers/clients or monitor and analyse business performance (business intelligence). In many cases firms are required to preserve data for periods of time by regulatory bodies in order to provide audit trails on their activities and where data is deemed personal, sensitive or private in relation to customers, suppliers or employees, firms will also be required by data protection laws to maintain that data.

The second issue pertains to the risk of sensitive data being seen by those who should not have access to it. Again data protection laws govern firms when it comes to only obtaining personal data with an individual’s permission and then ensuring that they control who has access, restricting unwarranted access. In addition however, firms will invariably want to keep their own business operations private as well to prevent competitors gaining an advantage on them.

All IT infrastructure needs to confront these security issues whether it be personal or enterprise level computing and this has been a particular challenge for cloud computing in general, including cloud based hosting.

The Vulnerabilities

Cloud computing services ultimately require networks of physical servers to create the pool of computing resource from which clients can access their computing as a service, which means that all cloud resources always have some form of physical location. In addition, cloud services rely on a point at which the end users can access them, often publicly available on the internet as well as of course a public network such as the internet to transfer the data used by the service. These three elements to a typical public cloud service each have their own vulnerabilities in terms of the protection and preservation of data.

Physical Security

In terms of the physical infrastructure used to build a cloud service, many of the security challenges are the same as those faced by any other hosting platform. To keep data secure, providers first need to keep the infrastructure secure and running, and the data centres where cloud servers are housed take great measures to these ends. In terms of access, they ensure that the facilities themselves are secured against unauthorised personnel by using tools such as biometrics, security cameras, guards and limited access to individual server suites. This not only controls the risk of intentional sabotage or physical hacks but also the risk of accidental damage caused by one engineer affecting another organisation’s servers, for example.

Furthermore, servers and network infrastructures are protected against physical damage using advanced fire protections systems and environmental controls such as temperature management. Controlling the temperature inside data centres is one of the primary expenses of a data centre provider due to the vast amount of heat generated by working servers. The aim of the exercise is to ensure that servers can run at their optimal temperatures but if left unchecked the damage caused could take servers offline completely. Data centres employ techniques such as chiller units, ventilation and water cooling to keep temperature regulated and servers running smoothly.

Cloud servers and their networks also benefit from the general expertise of data centre providers to keep the hardware maintained and up to date, ensuring that the chances of other hardware failures are reduced. As with alternative hosting solutions which locate servers in data centres, such as colocation, dedicated hosting and VPS (virtual private servers), this expertise may be accessed at a fraction of the cost it would take for businesses to deploy in-house.

However, these physical security measures are only the first step. The second part of this post explores the efforts taken to keep cloud hosting software operating smoothly and prevent data from falling into the wrong hands.

© Stuart Mitchell 2013

To find out more about overcoming the security challenges faced by cloud services you can visit this blog from a cloud industry expert.

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Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 4: Security

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Apr 102013
 

Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 4: Security

By Stuart P Mitchell

Having compared cloud with traditional dedicated hosting solutions on their respective costs and performance issues in the preceding posts in this series, the final instalment provides further analysis of the two in regard to security issues.

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Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 4: Security

Security

For many private and enterprise customers, security is the primary area of concern when making the switch from traditional localised computing to cloud computing solutions, particularly when it comes to the topic of hosting. Businesses that require high levels of security to be applied to their hosting platforms have traditionally flocked to dedicated hosting solutions, to avoid the vulnerabilities introduced by sharing servers with other companies or business functions. These enterprise customers have since been somewhat reticent to make the switch to cloud (despite the efficiencies mentioned previously).

Dedicated Server Security

Dedicated servers have, by design, features which are conducive to high levels of security in that they are individual platforms on discrete servers which are operated for single purposes – i.e., they do not share disk space or computing power with other services or businesses. This distinction leads to a number of security benefits in terms of both protecting access to hosted data and the preservation of that data. To achieve these twin aims, the risk of hackers or malware accessing the data and/or corrupting it is minimised; by not having any other functions/companies sharing the hosting platform it reduces the number of possible points of entry/access and therefore the number of security vulnerabilities on the server. What’s more, a business sharing a host server would have no control over the effectiveness of the measures taken to secure these vulnerabilities if they are sharing the server with third party businesses. The dedicated model also removes the competing demands placed on the physical computing capabilities of the server by other hosting platforms/solutions stacks/businesses’ IT projects, meaning that there is less risk of server or network failures leading to the unavailability or loss of data.

Cloud Hosting Security

Cloud Hosting platforms therefore need to re-address these issues as they fundamentally rely on the concept of shared or pooled computing resource. Public cloud models will struggle to offer the same protection as a dedicated platform because they not only share physical hosting infrastructure across multiple virtualised hosting platforms for disparate customers, but have further vulnerabilities in that the access points to such services are across public networks – in other words anyone can ‘knock on the door’ and any information being transferred between access point and server is at risk of being intercepted. Furthermore, one organisation who is a consumer of the service has no influence or control over the trustworthiness of others who may have signed up to share these pooled resources.

The answer to dedicated platforms for cloud computing is the private cloud. This model relies on the concept of ring-fencing a pool of computing resources for the use of a single organisation to eliminate the vulnerabilities of sharing. The concept has a variety of ways in which it can be physically implemented but where it involves a physically distinct pool of servers it can remove the aforementioned risks of sharing with third parties. In addition the use of a physically distinct line for access or on-site location of the servers can negate the risks of data being intercepted in transit or of unwanted access to the platform. However, by implementing measures such as these, organisations eliminate many of the economies of scale that make the cloud so attractive in the first place. Consequently, private clouds are often created using virtualisation to create ring fenced virtual networks of servers and secured access to those with technologies such as MPLS and VPN. These virtualised private clouds are becoming more and more secure and whilst they may not quite rival the physical independence of dedicated servers of localised private clouds there is a determination in the industry to close the gap and allow enterprise to benefit from the cost efficiencies and scalability benefits of cloud hosting without compromising on their security.

© Stuart Mitchell 2013

If you want to find out more about the respective benefits of cloud and dedicated hosting platforms then you can check out this blog from inside the cloud hosting industry.

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Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 3: Enterprise Focus

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Apr 102013
 

Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 3: Enterprise Focus

By Stuart P Mitchell

The third post in this series looks at some of the pros and cons of dedicated and cloud hosting solutions when it comes to providing the services that enterprise customers actually demand. Much focus in the industry has in the past been concentrated on the technical capabilities of the respective platforms but the key to adoption across enterprise is how that technology sates business requirements.

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Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 3: Enterprise Focus

Customer Experience

A traditional weakness of cloud computing, and perhaps a consequence of its on-demand access model is the area of SLAs and targeting enterprise consumers’ needs effectively. The utility style of the service means that consumers have to some extent fitted their computing needs to the cloud services available rather than vice versa in order to benefit from the economies of scale and reduced costs. After all, the service is to a large extent defined and packaged up by the provider with the consumer tapping into it as and when they need it.

Dedicated platforms have, in the past, outperformed cloud in this area with the ability to provide customisation and control over individual servers and the use of more suitable SLAs on better defines services. Businesses have been able to take their IT requirements to a provider of dedicated hosting and build the platform around it (cost permitting) leading to a more bespoke set up.

However, there is now a concerted effort within the cloud sector to provide better targeted enterprise applications with in-built flexibility, scalability and security as well as SLAs which accurately reflect the performance of these services and the needs of enterprise. An example of this move away from a one-size-fits all model is the development of the idea of cloud application stores where organisations can purchase the components they need individually to construct a cloud package which is tailored to their business needs. In other words, providers create and define individual components but customers configure their overall bespoke service using these elements.

Choice

The benefits mentioned above and in the preceding posts in relation to the cloud result in arguably the key long term driver for enterprise adoption of cloud hosting and cloud computing in general, that of choice. Ultimately, the flexibility of the model means that anything is theoretically possible for an enterprise customer if they have the budget and their provider has the resources.

The same can be said about traditional dedicated platforms (at a greater cost) but the scalability issues encountered by businesses using dedicated servers are, as stated, negated with cloud hosting by the removal of the concept of capacity. As mentioned previously dedicated platforms can be used to provide a bespoke hosting solution for enterprise customers at any level but once the platform is established any further changes to it may require time and expense. With cloud hosting, if a business wishes to try a particular project or campaign as a short term venture they can so with minimal lead time, pay-as-you-go costing, and responsive scaling, thus reducing these costs and the resulting risks of the venture.

Part 4 of this series of posts goes on to focus in more detail on the topic of security and how the two hosting solutions compare.

© Stuart Mitchell 2013

If you want to find out more about the respective benefits of cloud and dedicated hosting platforms then you can check out this blog on Infrastructure as a Service.

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Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 2: Performance

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Apr 102013
 

Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 2: Performance

By Stuart P Mitchell

The second installment of this series of posts looking at how cloud hosting platforms match up to traditional dedicated hosting platforms focuses on a number of issues which businesses look for in a package, including reliability, flexibility and responsiveness.

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Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 2: Performance

Timely

For both the provider and the consumer there are considerable differences between cloud and dedicated in the time in which the services can be up and running. As mentioned previously, dedicated hosting platforms require considerable input from the provider, often in consultation with the client to understand the business requirements, quote for a service and then set up and provision that platform (one of the reasons for providers seeking a fixed term lock in to ensure return on that invested time).

However, cloud hosting does not require the latter of these processes. Once the level of resources required by a business customer has been defined a quote can be calculated much quicker, because the resource is already in place, and the setup time is much reduced – in some cases almost instant – as the configuration needed to provide the final service is reduced. Consequently, dedicated hosting platforms may take weeks to provision whereas cloud hosting platforms can be provisioned in a matter of minutes or hours.

What’s more, when extra resource is required from a cloud hosting platform this again can often be provided and scaled in no time at all without the need for further server setups regardless of the demand. Instead already configured pooled computer resource can be tapped into as it is required. Dedicated platforms on the other hand may require the installation of further hardware and solution stacks, for example, when the capacity of the existing setup has been exceeded, and so the time lag that that entails.

Reliability

Each hosting platform has its own plus-points in the area of reliability and, conversely, it own issues on which it may be bettered. Cloud computing fundamentally relies on the premise of pooled computing resource and so redundancy is built into the core model. Whether it be within a public or private cloud, the physical liability for the hosting platform will be spread across numerous servers and so the risk of hardware/solution stack issues causing downtime is greatly spread and reduced. If one server goes offline, the hosting service will be maintained without interruption on the remaining servers. What’s more, if the hosting service utilises services from disparate data centres it can also negate the risk of localised failures (e.g., power cuts) causing downtime.

However, for a consumer the cloud model can involve ambiguities as to the stability and reliability of the underlying physical resources and the hosting provider themselves if they do not plump for a trusted provider with known network capabilities. The cloud moniker is easy and popular to apply to computing services without the necessary resources to ensure high reliability and performance and so the level of service experienced across providers can vary greatly.

Dedicated platforms however, benefit from reduced risk of failures in the first place as the server’s resources are not shared with other business’s functions and therefore are not at risk from their potential security vulnerabilities (see Part 3) or from these functions draining shared resources (bandwidth, disk space etc). The flip side of this is that any failures may take the entire server offline, although dedicated services will employ back up systems (often tape back ups which are low maintenance) to ensure that functions can be restored as quickly as possible if failures do occur – albeit not necessarily seamlessly as with cloud platforms.

© Stuart Mitchell 2013

If you want to find out more about the respective benefits of cloud and dedicated hosting platforms then you can check out this blog on cloud hosting.

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Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 1: Cost

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Apr 102013
 

Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 1: Cost

By Stuart P Mitchell

The following trilogy of articles investigates the benefits and drawbacks of cloud hosting in comparison to the more traditional ‘all singing, all dancing’ hosting solutions of dedicated servers. It aims to discuss why enterprise consumers in particular are so tempted to migrate to the cloud as well as the barriers that often prevent them taking the leap.

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Cloud Vs Dedicated Hosting – Part 1: Cost

Cost

The first great migration to cloud computing was centered on its most obvious benefit in comparison to traditional computing, that of cost efficiencies. Cloud hosting, more specifically, is no different and offers a number of cost savings for enterprise which are missing from traditional dedicated platforms. Although dedicated servers can offer a good number of services which are much desired, in particular by enterprise consumers, the physical investment in them comes at a certain cost.

The Cost of Dedicated Servers

A dedicated server may be completely ‘at the disposal’ of that one customer and, as such, may provide numerous security and performance benefits (as listed further on in series of posts) but maximum efficiency, in terms of the cost of the platforms versus the resource used, can only be realised if the platform is running at full capacity. If not, the consumer will inevitably be paying for capacity which they are getting any use from, because the cost of such platforms is met upfront. Essentially, customers are paying for physical capacity and it is then up to them to make use of it. Furthermore, if they need to increase resources (disk space, processing power etc) beyond current capacity, it requires upfront investment into the next ‘step up’, including the unused capacity that comes with that, as well as any reconfiguration and set up work that is required.

The Cost of Cloud Hosting

Conversely, the cloud computing model, including cloud hosting, revolves around the concept of tapping into pooled computing resource on demand. In other words a consumer can access the resource they need as and when they need it, and, moreover, only pay for what they use. It can operate in a fashion akin to a household utility such as water or electricity where the consumer is plugged into the public service and is then charged for what they consume. The capacity of the shared resource is vast and so there is no stepping up from one fixed capacity to another and no additional setup costs therefore involved. In practice, if a business wants to try a new venture they need only invest in the resource they require whilst they require it, without taking on damaging longer term costs. What’s more, the costs incurred by the maintenance of the underlying infrastructure (i.e., the pooled computing resource) can be diluted by economies of scale where there is no need for bespoke environments to be created for each consumer. This saving is perhaps less significant with cloud hosting on IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) and PaaS (Platform as a Service) than other cloud services such as SaaS (Software as a Service) because there are less opportunities to standardise elements of the service, although it still returns sizeable savings compared to traditional localised computing environments. Finally, cloud platforms are less likely to involve lock-ins to long term contracts. This is largely caused by the fact that there isn’t the need for a cloud provider to invest so much upfront in the creation and configuration of the cloud platform and consequently seek a return on that investment over a fixed term. Without this need for set up each time a platform is provisioned, cloud hosting services, like other cloud services can be simply turned on or off for the customer as and when needed. Part 2 of this article investigates some of the performance comparisons between cloud hosting and dedicated servers.

If you want to find out more about the respective benefits of cloud and dedicated hosting platforms then you can visit this dedicated and cloud hosting provider.

© Stuart Mitchell 2013

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Sep 072012
 

Cloud Hosting And Cloud Computing Material

Author:Gregory Ortegon

When you are looking for the most recent form of hosting that’s gathered loads of popularity the word cloud hosting is usually first in line. The thinking behind this is to divide and rule, which means to spread the desired sources for web site maintenance along web servers and they are rendered over a per need rationale. This style of hosting decreases downtime when there’s a server malfunction; furthermore, this permits the easiness of management for peak loads on account of an additional server which offers added resources. ‘The Cloud’ as it is known is in fact based upon groupings of servers that work with each other, this means that users won’t need to depend on just one single server, should it go down there is always a backup.

Cloud Hosting: A Summary

If you’re into searching for more details about cloud hosting and cloud computing on-line, then there is much to uncover, and you then are able to use the gathered facts to understand this particular term more, seeing as there are a number of things about cloud computing you have to familiarise yourself first.

First of all, you’ll want to at least get an understanding of what it is and how it does the job with regards to offering hosted services on the internet. Its driven by the cloud image that’s used for exhibiting the web in diagrams and also flowcharts. Different from the standard hosting, the cloud assistance offers distinct qualities. This type of service is bought upon demand, is adaptable and it’s completely maintained through the supplier.

The actual services are split in numerous categories namely:
– IaaS – Infrastructure-as-a-Service: IaaS supplies a virtual server for the end user, of which can work to start, stop, access and also configure virtual servers and its storage.
– PaaS – Platform-as-a-Service: PaaS is often a couple of product development and software tools which are hosted upon the provider’s infrastructure. Providers of this service might use website portals, APIs or getaway applications.
– SaaS – Software-as-a-Service: Here is where the user supplies all of the hardware and software products that they want to then connect to the user using a front end interface, as and when they need to

Benefits And Problems

There are specific benefits that this type of hosting can provide, which include the lowering of expense, a rise in storage, highly programmed, more freedom, versatility and also the opportunity to enable IT to shift focus. In a number of businesses, the employees may get the documents and data utilizing this service whether or not working remotely or outside work hours. They can still work collaboratively even if they’re not physically together given that paperwork can be seen and even modified from different locales. This particular hosting costs less and much less labour-intensive as there is no reason to install any software since it is already set up remotely online.

Although there are many benefits offered this sort of service, there are still issues that cannot be ignored. The issues and dangers involved have some thing regarding privacy, conformity, legality, abuse, security and sustainability.

With the London Cloud World Forum event, participants had the chance to get more information about the themes in cloud including applications, communications, security and safety, Customer relationship management, mobile phone, virtualization, cloud hosting news, and so much more, so you can find out much more guidance there also.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/information-technology-articles/cloud-hosting-and-cloud-computing-material-6129818.html

About the Author

Protect your personal privacy by using cloud computing

Aug 302011
 

Building the Private Cloud

Author: OnlineTech
A private cloud combines the benefits of cloud computing, flexibility and cost effectiveness, with the security, data integrity, and service level agreements (SLAs) of SAS 70-certified, managed dedicated server environment.

Cloud Computing Australia : Cloud Computing - Building the Private Cloud

Cloud Computing Australia : Cloud Computing - Building the Private Cloud

 Private cloud hosting delivers dedicated servers, storage, and networks, so each client is assured an exclusive framework that offers data integrity and network security. This eliminates the concerns inherent to a public cloud environment, such as other clients’ applications running on the same server.

Your company can share applications, storage, and network resources in a secure, dedicated environment that is physically separated from your provider’s other client environments. The hardware, SAN, virtualization, and operating systems are configured and managed by the provider to your unique specifications.

Some providers’ private cloud offerings utilize VMware as the engine to run its virtualization platform. VMware is the industry leader in virtualization, considered enterprise-grade, and is fourth generation vitualization technology. VMware and private cloud solution together provide the following benefits:

Reduce costs while increasing operational efficiencies – Quickly provision cloud resources for business critical applications as needed, and save your company the cost and inefficiency of additional underutilized hardware purchases, data center builds, and staffing.

Easily add and tune computing resources – Virtualization services allow easy scaling for each private cloud environment. A provider can dynamically add and tune computing resources for our private cloud clients as the demands on their applications grow and change. It eliminates the need for permanent investment when a temporary demand spike can be accommodated by accessing the resource pool.

Use experience to build your customized environments – A provider’s experience in multi-server environments, shared data storage, network security, and virtualization mean the operations team is ready to deliver private cloud solutions to meet your specific needs.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/technology-articles/building-the-private-cloud-3780595.html

About the Author

Online Tech offers a full spectrum of hosting solutions including basic colocation, managed colocation, managed dedicated servers and private cloud hosting in our Michigan colocation data centers. We can deliver our data center solutions more cost effectively, with lower overhead, less risk and better support than most IT departments can do themselves.